https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/gateway/plugin/AnnouncementFeedGatewayPlugin/atom Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies: Announcements 2021-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 Open Journal Systems <p><strong>Founded in 2003, the <em> Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies </em> (JCACS) is an open-access journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies (CACS).</strong></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><strong>Please note:</strong> The JCACS website has recently been reconstructed. Please email jcacs@lakeheadu.ca if you have problems navigating the site.</span></p> https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/126 Call for Submissions: The Scope of the TRC in Canadian Francophone Contexts 2021-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies <p>Editorial Team:</p> <p>Nancy Wiscutie-Crépeau, University of Ottawa</p> <p>Jo Anni Joncas, Université de Sherbrooke,</p> <p>Laurie Pageau, Université Laval </p> <p>Nicholas Ng-A-Fook, University of Ottawa</p> <p>“Canadians have much to benefit from listening to the voices, experiences, and wisdom of Survivors, Elders, and Traditional Knowledge Keepers—and much more to learn about reconciliation. Aboriginal peoples have an important contribution to make to reconciliation. Their knowledge systems, oral histories, laws, and connections to the land have vitally informed the reconciliation process to date, and are essential to its ongoing progress.” (Truth and Reconciliation Commission, 2015, p. 9) As we enter the International Decade of Indigenous Languages, set to begin in 2022, we feel it is crucial that all Canadians, both Anglophones and Francophones, have access to resources to fully understand the scope of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) (2015) and its Calls to Action (Tupper, 2014). Yet, to our knowledge, a large majority of the research is still addressed to a majority English-speaking Canadian context (and mostly in English). For example, Anglophone provincial policies related to public schooling curricula and/or teacher education programs are a step ahead in terms of addressing the 94 Calls to action put forth by the TRC (2015) (Pilote and Joncas, 2020). The same is true for research. Côté (2019) notes that "research on issues of integration of Aboriginal perspectives in French-language education in Canada is in its infancy, in both majority and minority settings" (personal translation; p. 25). Added to this is the small number of French-language resources in education that address First Nations, Inuit and Metis histories, perspectives and contemporary issues. However, within Canadian Francophone contexts, school and university communities have unique historical and contemporary relationships with Indigenous Peoples that require a fine-grained understanding in order to implement the TRC's (2015) Calls to Action. As an example, the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (NIMMIWG) has produced the additional "Kepek-Québec" (2019) report to account for specific relationships and particular issues, such as the language barrier in that province. The demands to recognize unique relations among Francophone and Indigenous People in Canada are tinged with respect, but also a desire to draw attention to their particular identity claims (Salée, 1995). Lefevre-Radelli and Dufour's (2016) study of francophone and anglophone universities in Montreal identify a distinction between them regarding the politics of inclusion of Indigenous perspectives, which they situate in relation to differing political, geographic and linguistic contexts, and by the conflicting relations between Quebec nationalism and Indigenous nationalisms. Among Francophones in minority settings, Côté (2019) explains that "the Other remains the Anglophone majority. Francophones do not seem to realize that they are the Other of the Indigenous People" (p. 34). Regardless of the Francophone context (minority or majority), knowledge about the issues and challenges of reconciliation are emerging. Moreover, the research that has been undertaken and the initiatives that have emerged in some settings are still poorly documented (Bousquet, 2016; Boutouchent, Phipps, Armstrong, &amp; Vachon-Savary, 2019; Côté, 2019; Dufour, 2021; Joncas &amp; Larivière, 2017; Kermoal &amp; Gareau, 2019; Lévesque, 2019). The paucity of work on indigenization, reconciliation, decolonization (Battiste, 2013; Tuck and Yang, 2012), and issues of settler colonialism in Canadian Francophone contexts motivated this special issue. We are interested in the possibilities and limitations of addressing the TRC (2015) Calls to Action in Francophone contexts, issues of indigenization, reconciliation and decolonization, identity including the dual one of colonized and non-indigenous, issues of educational and curricular policies (explicit, implicit-hidden, null), among others, in order to better understand the particular position of Francophone communities in the project of settlement colonialism in Canada. We welcome interdisciplinary proposals rooted in a variety of theoretical, disciplinary, methodological and conceptual approaches (narrative, poetic, empirical, artistic, critical, narrative-based inquiry, etc.), including an intersectional perspective, and are open to multimodal formats.</p> <p>Please submit a contribution proposal including a preliminary title and a 200-word abstract, clearly indicating how you are responding to the call by September 26, 2021. Please also include a short biography (50 words). Please submit directly on the JCACS website (https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs) into your author “folder”, and under the section called “TRC, Calls to Action”. Acceptance of proposals does not presume acceptance of the full manuscript, which will be subject to the journal's standard peer review process. Full manuscripts (in English or French, with a maximum 5000 words, not including references or abstracts) must be submitted by February 6, 2022. The journal accepts only original and unpublished papers that are not under review by another journal. Although JCACS has its own publication standards, please submit your proposal following APA 7 conventions for citations and references. Please use 12-point sans serif font and double-spacing.</p> <p>Important dates: 1. Deadline for receipt of proposals: September 26, 2021 2. Responses to authors: October 15, 2021 3. Deadline for receipt of complete manuscripts: March 4, 2022 4. Early publication date: September 2022</p> <p>References</p> <p>Battiste, M. (2013). Decolonizing education: Nourishing the learning spirit. Purich. Bousquet, M.-P. (2016). La constitution de la mémoire des pensionnats indiens au Québec : drame collectif ou histoire commune? Recherches Amérindiennes au Québec, 46(2-3), 165-199. Boutouchent, F., Phipps, H., Armstrong, C., &amp; Vachon-Savary, M.-È. (2019). Intégrer les perspectives autochtones : regards réflexifs sur le curriculum de la Saskatchewan et sur quelques pratiques en formation des maîtres en éducation française. Cahiers franco-canadiens de l'Ouest, 31(1), 127-153. https://doi.org/10.7202/1059129ar Côté, I. (2019). Les défis et les réussites de l’intégration des perspectives autochtones en éducation : synthèse des connaissances dans les recherches menées au Canada. Revue de langage, d’identité, de diversité et d’appartenance, 3(1), 28-45. http://bild-lida.ca/journal/volume-31-2019/les-defis-et-les-reussites-de-lintegration-des-perspectives-autochtones-en-education-synthese-des-connaissances-dans-les-recherches-menees-au-canada/ Côté, I. (2019). Théorie postcoloniale, décolonisation et colonialisme de peuplement : quelques repères pour la recherche en français au Canada. Cahiers franco-canadiens de l'Ouest, 31(1), 25-42. https://doi.org/10.7202/1059124ar Dufour, E. (2021). C'est le Québec qui est né dans mon pays ! : Carnet de rencontres, d'Ani Kuni à Kiuna. Écosociété. Joncas, J., &amp; Larivière, T. (2017). Miichiwap ou la construction d’espaces de recherche plus ouverts à l’université. Cahiers du CIÉRA, 15 (décembre), 64-87. Kermoal, N., &amp; Gareau, P. (2019). Réflexions sur l’autochtonisation des universités, un cours à la fois. Cahiers franco-canadiens de l'Ouest, 31(1), 71-88. Lévesque, C. (2019). L'éducation scolaire chez les Premières Nations et les Inuit du Québec : refaire nos devoirs, construire la réconciliation. Communication présentée à la Conférence de consensus : la mixité sociale et scolaire, mixité ethnoculturelle, Québec, Québec. Lefevre-Radelli, L., &amp; Dufour, E. (2016). Entre revendications nationales et expériences locales : la reconnaissance des Premières Nations dans les universités de Montréal (Québec). Cahiers de la recherche sur l’éducation et les savoirs, 15, 169-192. Pilote, A., &amp; Joncas, J. (2020). Survol de la situation concernant la reconnaissance des Premiers peuples dans la formation à l’enseignement au Canada. Note d’information destinée au ministère de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur. Université Laval. Salée, D. (1995). « Identities in conflict : the Aboriginal question and the politics of recognition in Québec » , Ethnic and Racial Studies, 18(2), 277-314. https://doi.org/10.1080/01419870.1995.9993864 Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2015). Honouring the truth, reconciling for the future: Summary of the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Available at http://www.trc.ca/assets/pdf/Executive_Summary_English_Web.pdf Tuck, E., &amp; Yang, K. W. (2012). Decolonizing is not a metaphor. Decolonizing: Indigeneity, Education &amp; Society, 1(1), 1-40. Tupper, J. (2014). The Possibilities for Reconciliation through Difficult Dialogues: Treaty Education as Peacebuilding, Curriculum Inquiry, 44(4), 469-488. Vaudrin-Charrette, J., &amp; Fleuret, C. (2016). Quelles avenues vers une pédagogie postcoloniale et multimodale en contexte plurilingue? La Revue canadienne des langues vivantes, 72(4), 550-571.</p> 2021-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/127 Appel à contributions: La portée de la CVR dans les contextes francophones canadiens 2021-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies <p>Équipe éditoriale :<br />Nancy Wiscutie-Crépeau, Université d’Ottawa <br />Jo Anni Joncas, Université de Sherbrooke <br />Laurie Pageau, Université Laval <br />et Nicholas Ng-A-Fook, Université d’Ottawa </p> <p>« Les Canadiens ont beaucoup à apprendre des voix, des expériences et de la sagesse des survivants, des aînés et des gardiens du savoir traditionnel [autochtones], et beaucoup plus encore à propos de la réconciliation. Les Peuples autochtones doivent pouvoir contribuer grandement à la réconciliation. Leurs systèmes de transmission des connaissances, leurs traditions orales, leurs lois et leurs liens profonds avec la terre ont tous revêtu une très grande importance dans le processus de réconciliation et sont essentiels à sa continuité. » (Commission de Vérité et Réconciliation, 2015, p. 10) À l’aube de la Décennie internationale des langues autochtones qui doit commencer en 2022, il nous semble essentiel que tous les Canadiens, tant anglophones que francophones, aient accès à des ressources leur permettant de bien saisir l’envergure de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation (CVR, 2015) et la portée de ses recommandations (Tupper, 2014). Or, à notre connaissance, une grande majorité des travaux y faisant référence s’inscrivent en contexte anglophone (et la plupart du temps en anglais). Par exemple, en éducation, les politiques provinciales, les curriculums et les programmes de formation à l’enseignement en contextes anglophones ont un pas d’avance quant à la considération des Peuples autochtones et, par le fait même, des recommandations de la CVR (2015) que les contextes francophones (Pilote et Joncas, 2020). Il en va de même pour la recherche. Côté (2019) constate que « la recherche sur les questions d’intégration des perspectives autochtones en éducation en français au Canada est embryonnaire, et ce, autant en milieu majoritaire que minoritaire » (p. 25). À cela s’ajoute le faible nombre de ressources en français qui s’intéresse aux histoires, aux perspectives et aux enjeux actuels de l’éducation des Premières Nations, des Inuit et des Métis. Pourtant, en contexte francophone canadien, les établissements scolaires et postsecondaires ont leurs propres réalités et relations historiques et contemporaines avec les Peuples autochtones qui demandent une compréhension fine afin de mettre en œuvre les Appels à l’action de la CVR (2015). À titre d’exemple, l’Enquête nationale sur les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues ou assassinées (ENFFADA) a déposé le rapport complémentaire « Kepek-Québec » (2019) afin de rendre compte des rapports spécifiques et des enjeux particuliers comme la barrière de la langue de cette province. Les demandes de reconnaissance des relations uniques entre les Francophones et les Peuples autochtones du Canada sont teintées de respect, mais aussi d'une volonté d'attirer l'attention sur leurs revendications identitaires particulières (Salée, 1995). L’étude de Lefevre-Radelli et Dufour (2016) dans des universités francophones et anglophones de Montréal relève une distinction entre elles concernant les politiques d’inclusion des perspectives autochtones, qu’elles expliquent par une situation politique, géographique et linguistique particulière, et par des relations conflictuelles entre le nationalisme québécois et les nationalismes autochtones. Chez des francophones en milieu minoritaire, Côté (2019) explique que « l’Autre demeure la majorité anglophone. Les francophones ne semblent pas se rendre compte qu’ils sont l’Autre des Autochtones » (p. 34). Quel que soit le contexte francophone (minoritaire ou majoritaire), les connaissances par rapport aux enjeux et aux défis que pose la réconciliation sont émergentes; les travaux de recherche amorcés et les initiatives qui ont vu le jour dans certains milieux sont encore peu documentés (Bousquet, 2016; Boutouchent, Phipps, Armstrong et Vachon-Savary, 2019; Côté, 2019; Dufour, 2021; Joncas et Larivière, 2017; Kermoal et Gareau, 2019; Lévesque, 2019). La paucité des travaux concernant l’autochtonisation, la réconciliation, la décolonisation (Battiste, 2013; Tuck et Yang, 2012) et les questions de colonialisme de peuplement en contextes francophones canadiens ont motivé ce numéro spécial. Nous nous intéressons aux possibilités et limites des appels à l’action de la CVR (2015) en contextes francophones, aux questions d’autochtonisation, de réconciliation et de décolonisation, d’identité notamment celle duale de colonisé et d’allochtone, aux enjeux relatifs aux politiques éducatives et de curriculum (explicite, implicite-caché, nul), entre autres, afin de mieux comprendre la position particulière des communautés francophones dans le projet de colonialisme de peuplement au Canada. Nous souhaitons recevoir des propositions interdisciplinaires ancrées dans diverses approches théoriques, disciplinaires, méthodologiques et conceptuelles (enquête narrative, poétique, empirique, artistique, critique, par récit, etc.), notamment une perspective intersectionnelle, et nous sommes ouverts à des productions multimodales.</p> <p>Veuillez soumettre une proposition de contribution incluant un titre préliminaire et un résumé de 200 mots (indiquant clairement comment vous répondez à l'appel au plus tard le 26 septembre 2021. Veuillez également inclure une courte biographie (50 mots). Veuillez soumettre votre proposition directement sur le site de JCACS/RACEC (https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jc) dans votre dossier « auteur » et dans la section intitulée « CVR : Appels à l’action ». L’acceptation des propositions ne présume pas l’acceptation du manuscrit complet, lequel sera soumis à la procédure d’évaluation habituelle de la revue (évaluation par les pairs). Les manuscrits complets (en français ou anglais, maximum 5000 mots , références et résumés non-inclus) devront être soumis avant le 6 février 2022. La revue n’accepte que les textes originaux et inédits qui ne sont pas en évaluation par une autre revue. Bien que le JCACS/RACEC ait ses propres normes de publication, veuillez soumettre votre proposition en respectant les conventions APA 7 pour les citations et les références. Veuillez utiliser une police sans empattement de 12 points et un double interligne.</p> <p>Dates importantes : <br />1. Date limite réception des propositions : 26 septembre 2021 2. Réponses aux auteur(-e)s : 15 octobre 2021 3. Date limite réception des manuscrits complets : 4 mars 2022 4. Date anticipée de publication : septembre 2022</p> <p>Références <br />Battiste, M. (2013). Decolonizing education: Nourishing the learning spirit. Purich. <br />Bousquet, M.-P. (2016). La constitution de la mémoire des pensionnats indiens au Québec : drame collectif ou histoire commune? Recherches Amérindiennes au Québec, 46(2-3), 165-199. <br />Boutouchent, F., Phipps, H., Armstrong, C. et Vachon-Savary, M.-È. (2019). Intégrer les perspectives autochtones : regards réflexifs sur le curriculum de la Saskatchewan et sur quelques pratiques en formation des maîtres en éducation française. Cahiers franco-canadiens de l'Ouest, 31(1), 127-153. https://doi.org/10.7202/1059129ar <br />Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada. (2015). Honorer la vérité, réconcilier pour l'avenir : sommaire du rapport final de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada. Repéré à http://www.trc.ca/assets/pdf/French _Exec_Summary_web_revised.pdf <br />Côté, I. (2019). Les défis et les réussites de l’intégration des perspectives autochtones en éducation : synthèse des connaissances dans les recherches menées au Canada. Revue de langage, d’identité, de diversité et d’appartenance, 3(1), 28-45. http://bild-lida.ca/journal/volume-31-2019/les-defis-et-les-reussites-de-lintegration-des-perspectives-autochtones-en-education-synthese-des-connaissances-dans-les-recherches-menees-au-canada/ <br />Côté, I. (2019). Théorie postcoloniale, décolonisation et colonialisme de peuplement : quelques repères pour la recherche en français au Canada. Cahiers franco-canadiens de l'Ouest, 31(1), 25-42. https://doi.org/10.7202/1059124ar <br />Dufour, E. (2021). C'est le Québec qui est né dans mon pays ! : Carnet de rencontres, d'Ani Kuni à Kiuna. Écosociété. <br />Joncas, J., &amp; Larivière, T. (2017). Miichiwap ou la construction d’espaces de recherche plus ouverts à l’université. Cahiers du CIÉRA, 15 (décembre), 64-87. <br />Kermoal, N., &amp; Gareau, P. (2019). Réflexions sur l’autochtonisation des universités, un cours à la fois. Cahiers franco-canadiens de l'Ouest, 31(1), 71-88. <br />Lévesque, C. (2019). L'éducation scolaire chez les Premières Nations et les Inuit du Québec : refaire nos devoirs, construire la réconciliation. Communication présentée à la Conférence de consensus : la mixité sociale et scolaire, mixité ethnoculturelle, Québec, Québec. <br />Lefevre-Radelli, L., &amp; Dufour, E. (2016). Entre revendications nationales et expériences locales : la reconnaissance des Premières Nations dans les universités de Montréal (Québec). Cahiers de la recherche sur l’éducation et les savoirs, 15, 169-192. <br />Pilote, A., &amp; Joncas, J. (2020). Survol de la situation concernant la reconnaissance des Premiers peuples dans la formation à l’enseignement au Canada. Note d’information destinée au ministère de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur. Université Laval. <br />Salée, D. (1995). « Identities in conflict : the Aboriginal question and the politics of recognition in Québec » , Ethnic and Racial Studies, 18(2), 277-314. https://doi.org /10.1080/01419870.1995.9993864 <br />Tuck, E., &amp; Yang, K. W. (2012). Decolonizing is not a metaphor. Decolonizing: Indigeneity, Education &amp; Society, 1(1), 1-40. <br />Tupper, J. (2014). The Possibilities for Reconciliation through Difficult Dialogues: Treaty Education as Peacebuilding, Curriculum Inquiry, 44(4), 469-488. <br />Vaudrin-Charrette, J. et Fleuret, C. (2016). Quelles avenues vers une pédagogie postcoloniale et multimodale en contexte plurilingue?, La Revue canadienne des langues vivantes, 72(4), 550-571.</p> 2021-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/125 Call for Submissions: Book Reviews 2021-02-15T22:57:05-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies JCACS welcomes book reviews (and reviews of other academic works). Reviews may be submitted through our online submission portal at any time. Furthermore, if you have a suggestion for a work to review, or if you have an idea for a review, or if you’d like to get suggestions for works to review, please contact our JCACS Book Review Editor, Olga Fellus, at olga.fellus@uottawa.ca. 2021-02-15T22:57:05-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/124 Appel à contributions: Recensions 2021-02-15T22:55:10-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies A La Revue de l’association canadienne pour l’étude de curriculum (RACEC), les recensions des livres (ou d’autres ouvrages académiques) sont toujours les bienvenues. Les recensions peuvent être soumises directement par le biais du notre portail de soumission. Aussi, si vous avez une suggestion à propos d’un œuvre qui vaut la peine d’être discuté, si vous avez en plus une idée pour une recension, ou vous aimeriez recevoir des suggestions des ouvrages à critiquer, veuillez contactez notre rédactrice des recensions, Olga Fellus à olga.fellus@uottawa.ca. 2021-02-15T22:55:10-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/122 Séminaire en ligne 2021-02-15T22:47:03-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies En collaboration avec le programme conjoint de doctorat en études de l'éducation des universités, Brock, Lakehead et Windsor, Rédactrice des recensions à La Revue de l’association canadienne pour l’étude de curriculum (RACÉC), Olga Fellus (MA, MEd, PhD), a offert un séminaire en ligne le 9 décembre 2020, intitulé « A Conversation About Conversational Book Reviews ». A tous les participants, Dr Fellus a prodigué de sages conseils à propos de l’analyse critique des ouvrages en matière d’éducation et de curriculum. Tout en encourageant la discussion et en répondant aux questions de participants, ces derniers l’ont trouvé très intéressante et disaient avoir hâte d’essayer des recensions. Une vidéo de ce séminaire a été publiée sur YouTube à l’adresse suivante : https://youtu.be/kO2mKB6rCxY. 2021-02-15T22:47:03-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/123 Online Seminar 2021-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies In partnership with the Joint PhD Program of Lakehead University, Brock University and the University of Windsor, JCACS’ book editor Olga Fellus (MA, MEd, PhD) offered an online seminar on December 9, 2020 titled “A Conversation About Conversational Book Reviews”. With many graduate students from the Joint PhD program in attendance, Dr. Fellus gave wise advice about writing academic book reviews, all the while prompting discussion and answering questions about this scholarly activity. Participants left the seminar feeling encouraged and enabled to write critical book reviews that contribute to academic discourse. A video of the seminar may be found at https://youtu.be/kO2mKB6rCxY. 2021-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/120 Call for Submissions: The Breath in Our Bones: Poetic Inquiry in Search of Air 2021-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Guest Editors: Amanda Gulla, Adam Henze, Natalie Honein, Nicole Morris, Adam Podolski and Molly Sherman "We cried and sobbed and wept and bled tears. But when we were finished all we could do was continue living." – Nnedi Okorafor (2010, p. 31) On June 29th, 2020, The New York Times published an article surveying over 70 cases in the United States where people have died in police custody after uttering the phrase, “I can’t breathe” (Baker et al., 2020). The brutal killings of Black people such as Eric Garner, George Floyd, Ahmad Aubrey, Breonna Taylor, and countless others, have caused indignation across the world, forcing us to frame White supremacy and police brutality as a theft of breath. Indeed, the year 2020 seems like a year of reckoning for many people, and the novel coronavirus, widespread wildfires and other environmental disasters have encouraged artists and academics everywhere to reconsider the preciousness of breath. In building upon the momentum gained during the 2019 International Symposium on Poetic Inquiry and its theme of honouring the International Year of Indigenous Languages, this special issue of JCACS aims to amplify and intersect such themes as the following: lost and found languages; unearthing the tongues that have fed us and informed our ways of being; dismantling of the settler-colonizer paradigm; exposing the disparities within the healthcare system before and during a global pandemic; and of course the blight of White supremacy. All of these themes challenge our capacity to access air. The poet-researcher Camea Davis (2018) stated that poets yield a particular power to “resist passivity, and critique the prescribed politics of their lived experiences” (p. 124). It is critical in the current state of a pandemic and civil uprisings, where large segments of humanity are struggling for breath, for this poetic power to be harnessed to bring to the centre and amplify the voices of the marginalized. Poetic inquiry offers us a means to be bold in a fragile time (Prendergast et al., 2009; Faulkner & Cloud, 2019). It is a way to paint a concrete depiction of a world that appears to be falling apart. It is a way to brand complex political messages to stake out and occupy a new space when the virus says we cannot. Invitation: We invite research presented at the 2019 International Symposium on Poetic Inquiry, as well as new poetic inquiry, using a wide variety of methodological approaches, including critical prose, poetry, visual art and multimedia creations. We seek work that engages, plays with, ignites and challenges notions of action in a time of legislated inaction, work that counteracts silencing the breath inside our bones. We are looking for oxygen where there is none. Please submit an abstract of 200 words and a 50-word biography on the same page to https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs under the “Breath” section. JCACS has its own style guide. For the submission, please follow APA 7 conventions and as we are an online journal, please use a sans-serif font, such as Arial or Calibri 12 point. Timeline and Key Dates: ● Proposal submission deadline: February 15, 2021 ● Proposal responses: March 1, 2021 ● Deadline for full article: April 19, 2021 ● Responses: June 14, 2021 ● Anticipated publication date: October 2021 References Baker, M., Valentino-DeVries, J., Fernandez, M., & LaForgia, M. (2020, June 29). Three Words. 70 Cases. The Tragic History of “I Can’t Breathe”. New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/28/us/i-cant-breathe-police-arrest.html Davis, C. (2018). Writing the self: Slam poetry, youth identity, and critical poetic inquiry. Art/Research International: A Transdisciplinary Journal, (3)1, 90-113. https://doi.org/10.18432/ari29251 Faulkner, S., & Cloud, A. (Eds.). (2019). Poetic inquiry as social justice and political response. Vernon. Okorafor, N. (2010). Who fears death. DAW/Penguin. Prendergast, M., Leggo C., & Sameshima, P. (Eds.). (2009). Poetic inquiry: Vibrant voices in the social sciences. Brill/Sense. 2021-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/121 Appel à contributions: Le souffle dans nos os : une enquête poétique à la recherche de l'air 2021-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Rédacteurs/trices invités : Amanda Gulla, Adam Henze, Natalie Honein, Nicole Morris, Adam Podolski et Molly Sherman « Nous pleurâmes et sanglotâmes et pleurâmes et saignâmes des larmes. Mais quand nous finîmes, tout ce que nous pouvions faire était de continuer à vivre. » "We cried and sobbed and wept and bled tears. But when we were finished all we could do was continue living." – Nnedi Okorafor (2010, p. 31) Le 29 juin 2020, le New York Times a publié un article en quoi s’agissait de plus de 70 cas aux États-Unis où des personnes sont décédées en garde à vue après avoir prononcé la phrase « Je ne peux pas respirer » (Baker et al., 2020). Les meurtres brutaux des Noirs tels qu'Eric Garner, George Floyd, Ahmad Aubrey, Breonna Taylor et d'innombrables autres ont provoqué l'indignation à travers le monde, nous forçant à qualifier la suprématie blanche et la brutalité policière vis-à-vis le vol de souffle. En effet, l'année 2020 semble être une année de rendre des comptes pour de nombreuses personnes, et le nouveau coronavirus, les incendies de forêt généralisés et d'autres catastrophes environnementales ont encouragé les artistes et les universitaires du monde entier à reconsidérer la préciosité de la respiration. En s'appuyant sur l'élan acquis lors du Symposium international sur l'enquête poétique 2019 et son thème d'honorer l'Année internationale des langues autochtones, ce numéro spécial de la RACÉC/JCACS vise à amplifier et à croiser des thèmes tels que les suivants : des langues perdues et trouvées; déterrer les langues qui nous ont nourris et qui ont éclairé nos manières d'être; le démantèlement du paradigme colonisateur/trice; exposer les disparités au sein du système de santé avant et pendant une pandémie mondiale; et bien sûr le fléau de la suprématie blanche. Tous ces thèmes remettent en question notre capacité d'accès à l'air. La poète-chercheuse Camea Davis (2018) a déclaré que les poètes donnent un pouvoir particulier pour « résister à la passivité et critiquer la politique prescrite de leurs expériences vécues » (p. 124). Dans l'état actuel de la pandémie et des soulèvements civils, où de larges segments de l'humanité luttent pour respirer, il est essentiel que ce pouvoir poétique soit exploité pour amener au centre et pour amplifier les voix des marginalisé(e)s. L'enquête poétique nous offre un moyen d'être audacieux dans une époque fragile (Prendergast et al., 2009; Faulkner et Cloud, 2019). C'est une façon de peindre une représentation concrète d'un monde qui semble s'effondrer. C'est un moyen de marquer des messages politiques complexes pour implanter et occuper un nouvel espace lorsque le virus dit que nous ne pouvons pas. Une Invitation : Nous invitons les recherches présentées au Symposium international 2019 sur l'enquête poétique, ainsi que de la nouvelle enquête poétique, en utilisant une grande variété d'approches méthodologiques, y compris la prose critique, la poésie, les arts visuels et les créations multimédias. Nous recherchons un travail qui engage, joue avec, enflamme et remet en question les notions d'action à une époque d'inaction législative, un travail qui contrecarre le silence du souffle à l'intérieur de nos os. Nous recherchons de l'oxygène là où il n'y en a pas. Veuillez soumettre un résumé de 200 mots et une biographie de 50 mots sur la même page à https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs dans la section « Souffle » (Breath). La RACÉC/JCACS a son propre guide de style. Pour la soumission, veuillez suivre les conventions « APA 7 » et puisque nous sommes un journal en ligne, veuillez utiliser une police de caractère sans empattement, telle que l’Arial ou le Calibri à 12 points. Calendrier et dates clés : ● Date limite de soumission des propositions : 15 février 2021 ● Réponses aux propositions : 1er mars 2021 ● Date limite pour l'article complet: 19 avril 2021 ● Réponses : 14 juin 2021 ● Date de publication prévue : octobre 2021 Références Baker, M., Valentino-DeVries, J., Fernandez, M., & LaForgia, M. (2020, June 29). Three Words. 70 Cases. The Tragic History of “I Can’t Breathe”. New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/06/28/us/i-cant-breathe-police-arrest.html Davis, C. (2018). Writing the self: Slam poetry, youth identity, and critical poetic inquiry. Art/Research International: A Transdisciplinary Journal, (3)1, 90-113. https://doi.org/10.18432/ari29251 Faulkner, S., & Cloud, A. (Eds.). (2019). Poetic inquiry as social justice and political response. Vernon. Okorafor, N. (2010). Who fears death. DAW/Penguin. Prendergast, M., Leggo C., & Sameshima, P. (Eds.). (2009). Poetic inquiry: Vibrant voices in the social sciences. Brill/Sense. 2021-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/118 Call for Submissions: Walking: Attuning to an Earthly Curriculum 2020-05-20T00:00:00-04:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Guest Editors: Ellyn Lyle, Yorkville University, Jodi Latremouille, Thompson Rivers University, & David Jardine, University of Calgary (retired) miyo waskawewin Walk gently on mother earth Pay attention Tread lightly Recognize its wisdom (Lesley Tait, as cited in Latremouille et al., 2016, p. 21) Beginning from the assumption that we must learn to wonder as we wander, this special issue was conceived to advance theory and practice as it relates to walking as both an intentional physical activity and a curricular understanding of traversing with and through landscapes of topical relations in attunement with the Earth. Walking: Attuning to an Earthly Curriculum is a call to a participatory, practical, spiritual sensory, and theoretical curriculum experience within a field of places and relations. Within this call, and with each other, we ask, how we might imagine our curriculum topics as territories to be traversed carefully and thoughtfully and lovingly, in tune with environmental consciousness and human conscientiousness? We understand this meandering pursuit of critical consciousness as an intimate reciprocity (Abram, 1997) made possible through a resonant attunement with the Earth. Such a solidarity can further nurture our teaching, learning, exploring and being. Feinberg (2016) writes of a walking-based pedagogy that sees curriculum as “lived and emerging, somatic and contextual, personal yet political, and enhanced by curiosity and listening” (p. 150). Being attentive to the world in this way fosters curiosity regarding the ways our walking might resonate, attune, align, or dwell with the rhythms of the earth. Walking: Attuning to an Earthly Curriculum aims to raise awareness of our human being on this planet and, in so doing, attunement may be taken up in a variety of ways: spiritual (belonging in nature); intellectual (learning about relationships); physical (affecting the body); emotional (exploring love of nature); and imaginative (learning through creative engagement). We are interested in receiving critical and diverse methodological approaches and submissions. Please submit a 250-word abstract or proposal to JCACS (to the section “Walking”) that makes clear how you will respond to the call. Please also include a brief (50-word) biography. While JCACS has its own style guide, please submit your proposal following APA 7 conventions for citations and references. Please use a 12-point sans serif font and double spacing. Timeline and Key Dates: • Proposal Deadline: June 25, 2020 • Proposal Responses: July 17, 2020 • Deadline for full articles: Sept. 7, 2020 • Anticipated Publication Date: Dec. 2020 References Abram, D. (1997). The spell of the sensuous: Perception and language in a more-than-human world. Vintage Books. Feinberg, P. P. (2016). Towards a walking-based pedagogy. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 14(1), 147-165. https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/article/download/40312/36186 Latremouille, J., Bell, A., Krahn, M., Kasamali, Z., Tait, L, & Donald, D. (2016). kistikwânihk êsko kitêhk: Storying holistic understandings in education. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 14(1), 8-22. https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/article/view/40294 2020-05-20T00:00:00-04:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/119 Appel à contributions: Marcher : s'accorder à un curriculum terrestre 2020-05-20T00:00:00-04:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Rédacteurs/trices invités : Ellyn Lyle, l’Université Yorkville, Jodi Latremouille, l’Université de Thompson Rivers, & David Jardine, l’Université de Calgary (retraité) miyo waskawewin Marchez doucement sur la terre mère Faites attention Avancez d’un pas légèr Reconnaissez sa sagesse (Lesley Tait, tel que cité par Latremouille et al., 2016, p. 21) Partant de l'hypothèse qu’il nous faut apprendre à nous demander en nous promenant, ce numéro spécial a été conçu pour faire progresser la théorie et la pratique en ce qui concerne la marche en tant qu'activité physique intentionnelle et compréhension curriculaire de la traversée avec et à travers des paysages de relations d'actualité en harmonisation avec la terre. Marcher : s'accorder à un curriculum terrestre est un appel à une expérience participative, pratique, spirituelle sensorielle et théorique dans un champ de lieux et de relations. Dans le cadre de cet appel et les uns avec les autres, nous nous demandons : comment imaginer nos sujets curriculaires comme des territoires à parcourir avec soin, réflexion et amour, en harmonie avec la conscience environnementale et la conscience humaine ? Nous comprenons cette poursuite sinueuse de la conscience critique comme une réciprocité intime (Abram, 1997) rendue possible grâce à une harmonisation résonnante avec la terre. Une telle solidarité peut nourrir davantage notre enseignement, notre apprentissage, notre exploration et notre existence. Feinberg (2016) parle d'une pédagogie basée sur la marche qui considère le curriculum comme « vécu et émergent, somatique et contextuel, personnel mais politique, et renforcé par la curiosité et l'écoute » (p. 150). Être attentif au monde de cette manière stimule la curiosité quant aux façons dont notre marche peut résonner, s'accorder, s'aligner ou demeurer avec les rythmes de la terre. Marcher : s'accorder à un programme terrestre vise à sensibiliser notre existence humaine sur cette planète et, de cette manière, l'harmonisation peut s’adopter de diverses manières : spirituelle (l’appartenance à la nature) ; intellectuelle (l’apprentissage des relations) ; physique (ce qui fait effet au corps) ; émotionnelle (l’exploration de l'amour de la nature); et imaginative (l’apprentissage par l'engagement créatif). Nous souhaitons recevoir des soumissions et des approches méthodologiques critiques et diverses. Veuillez soumettre un résumé ou une proposition de 250 mots à la RACÉC (à la section « La Marche ») qui indique clairement comment vous répondrez à l'appel. Veuillez également inclure une brève biographie (de 50 mots). Bien que la RACÉC ait son propre guide de style, veuillez soumettre votre proposition conformément aux conventions « APA 7 » (adapté au français) pour les citations et les références. Veuillez utiliser une police de caractère sans empattement à 12 points et un double espacement. Chronologie et dates clés : • Date limite de soumission des propositions : le 25 juin 2020 • Réponses aux propositions : le 17 juillet 2020 • Date limite pour les manuscrits complets : le 7 septembre 2020 • Date de publication prévue : en décembre 2020 Références Abram, D. (1997). The spell of the sensuous: Perception and language in a more-than-human world. [Le charme du sensuel : perception et langage dans un monde plus qu'humain] Vintage Books. Feinberg, P. P. (2016). Towards a walking-based pedagogy. [Vers une pédagogie basée sur la marche.] La revue de l’association canadienne pour l’étude de curriculum, 14(1), 147-165. https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/article/download/40312/36186 Latremouille, J., Bell, A., Krahn, M., Kasamali, Z., Tait, L, & Donald, D. (2016). kistikwânihk êsko kitêhk: Storying holistic understandings in education. [Raconter des compréhensions holistiques dans l'éducation.] La revue de l’association canadienne pour l’étude de curriculum, 14(1), 8-22. https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/article/view/40294/36182 2020-05-20T00:00:00-04:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/116 Call for Submissions: Were you accepted to present at CSSE 2020? 2020-05-12T00:00:00-04:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Was your presentation submitted to CACS or one of CACS’ Special Interest Groups? CSSE is an opportune time for all scholars to connect with each other and to learn about new and ongoing research. With CSSE being cancelled this year we were not afforded this opportunity. As such, thinking about ways to continue to mobilize and distribute research and to continue to build networks among scholars, the Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies (JCACS) will be publishing CACS Refereed Abstract Proceedings of Presentations that were accepted for CSSE 2020. If your presentation was accepted to the 2020 CSSE within the CACS Association (or if applicable, to the CACS' SIGS including LLRC, SERG, RÉÉFMM, CCPA, and ARTS), and you would like to be included in this publication, here’s what to do. • Revise your abstract, as needed. Take into consideration feedback from your CSSE submission. Consider its legibility as a stand-alone narrative. • Check length: abstracts should be no longer than 250 words. • Maintain work in original language, French or English, as it was submitted to CSSE. The abstracts will not be translated. • Prepare work as a word document, in a 12-point sans-serif font (e.g., Calibri). • Register with JCACS, if not already a member/user, here. • Upload your abstract to the journal section, “CSSE 2020 Proceedings”. • Indicate the Special Interest Group this proposal was accepted in. • Add keywords. • Include a biography of not more than 50 words. We suggest that your refereed abstract may be referenced as follows, as per APA 7 guidelines (engaging actual URL of the issue): Presenter, A. A., & Presenter, B. B. (2020, May 29-June 4). Title of presentation [Abstract accepted for cancelled presentation]. Canadian Society for the Study of Education Conference, London, Ontario, Canada. https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/issue/view/#### Submissions are due by May 31, 2020. We anticipate a publication date of June, 2020. 2020-05-12T00:00:00-04:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/117 Appel à contributions: Aviez-vous accepté de présenter à la SCÉÉ 2020 ? 2020-05-12T00:00:00-04:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Votre communication a-t-elle été soumise à l’ACÉC/CACS ou à l’un des groupes d’intérêt spécial de l’ACÉC/CACS ? La SCÉÉ/CSSE est un moment opportun pour toutes les chercheuses et tous les chercheurs de se retrouver et de se renseigner au sujet des recherches nouvelles et celles en cours. La SCÉÉ/CSSE ayant été annulée cette année, nous n'avons pas eu cette possibilité. À ce titre, en réfléchissant aux moyens de continuer à mobiliser et à diffuser les recherches et pour continuer de créer des réseaux entre les chercheurs, La revue de l'association canadienne pour l’étude de curriculum (RACÉC/JCACS) publiera les résumés des communications arbitrées de l'ACCS qui ont été acceptées pour la SCÉÉ/CSSE 2020. Si votre communication a été acceptée à la SCÉÉ/CSSE 2020 au sein de l'Association ACÉC/CACS (ou le cas échéant, aux ACÉC/CACS SIGS y compris ACCLL, GRES RÉÉFMM, ACPC et SCEA), et vous souhaitez être inclus dans cette publication, voici ce qu’il faudra faire. • Révisez votre résumé, au besoin. Tenez compte des commentaires de votre soumission à SCÉÉ/CSSE. Considérez sa lisibilité en tant qu’un récit autonome. • Vérifiez le nombre de mots : il ne faut pas que les résumés dépassent 250 mots. • Maintenez laangue originale du résumé, soit français ou en anglais, telle qu'elle a été soumise à la SCÉÉ/CSSE. Les résumés ne seront pas traduits. • Préparez le travail en tant que document Word, dans une police de caractères sans empattement à 12 points (par exemple, Calibri). • Inscrivez-vous auprès de la RACÉC/JCACS, si vous n’êtes pas déjà membre / utilisatrice / utilisateur, ici. • Téléchargez votre résumé dans la section du journal intiulée « Actes de la SCÉÉ 2020 ». • Indiquez dans quel groupe d'intérêt spécial cette proposition a été acceptée. • Ajoutez des mots clés. • Incluez une biographie de 50 mots maximum. Nous suggérons que votre résumé référencé puisse être formaté à la façon suivante, conformément aux directives de l'APA 7 (normes françaises) (engageant l'URL réelle du numéro) : Présentatrice, A. A., et Présentateur, B. B. (2020, le 29 mai-le 4 juin). Titre de la présentation [Résumé accepté pour la présentation annulée]. La Conférence de la Société canadienne pour l’étude de l’éducation, London, Ontario, Canada. https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/issue/view/#### Les soumissions doivent être reçues avant le 31 mai 2020. Nous prévoyons une date de publication en juin 2020. 2020-05-12T00:00:00-04:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/114 Call for Submissions: Jobs at JCACS! 2019-12-03T00:00:00-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Seeking JCACS Community Coordinator Position The Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies is seeking a dynamic, independent and organized Communications Coordinator! The JCACS Communications Coordinator will work with the JCACS Editorial Team as well as the CACS Communications Committee to develop JCACS social media strategies, organize and oversee social journalism blogs, moderate online discussions, oversee the journal community innovations, develop followers, increase our social media networks and track analytics, in both French and English. The Community Coordinator will also be responsible to create an annual report. There is a stipend for this 3-year position of $2000 in Year 1, $2400 in year 2, and $1000 in Year 3. Applications will be accepted from bilingual candidates or from two candidates, one English and one French speaking. To apply for this position, please submit your CV to the Editor-in-Chief, Pauline Sameshima, psameshima@lakeheadu.ca, by December 15, 2019. Seeking JCACS French Translators Pool The Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies is seeking members for a French Translators’ Pool. The translator will work with the French Associate Editor. A stipend of $100 CAD is offered to translators per issue, to translate 5-8 abstracts. To apply for this position, please submit your CV to the Editor-in-Chief, Pauline Sameshima, psameshima@lakeheadu.ca, and the Associate Editor, Phyllis Dalley, pdalley@uottawa.ca, by December 15, 2019. Seeking JCACS Associate Editor The Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies is seeking a strong English writer with excellent communication skills to be the next JCACS Associate Editor. This is a 3-year position. The JCACS English Associate Editor works closely with the JCACS Editor-in-Chief and the Managing Editor. The Associate Editor works with the authors, once a manuscript is accepted, to produce a Word document that is the result of deep and surface editing processes. The Associate Editor ensures that the quality of the submission accords with JCACS’s mandate and guidelines, in terms of substantive content, and is free of content or copyright errors and which conforms to APA 7 guidelines regarding attribution and citation of other works. It is also the responsibility of the Associate Editor to forward any ethical concerns regarding the research or writing processes in the papers to the attention of the Managing Editor and the Editor-in-Chief. This position is not remunerated. To apply for this position, please submit your CV to the Editor-in-Chief, Pauline Sameshima, psameshima@lakeheadu.ca, by December 15, 2019. Seeking Book Review Editors 1 French and 1 English The Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies is seeing two committed Book Review Editors. This is a 3-year position. The Book Review editors will seek and consider book recommendations from the CACS membership and from the publishing field, invite reviewers, arrange for books from the publishers to be sent or e-transmitted to the reviewers, create timelines with the reviewers, edit the submissions, and proofread the galleys after edits and layouts by the Managing, Associate and Chief Editors are completed. This position is not remunerated. To apply for this position, please submit your CV to the Editor-in-Chief, Pauline Sameshima, psameshima@lakeheadu.ca, by December 15, 2019. Seeking Technology Support Coordinator The Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies is seeing a Technology Support Coordinator. This is a 3-year position. The candidate will work with the JCACS Editor-in-Chief and the Managing Editor to manage, update, and innovate the current OJS system. This position is not remunerated; however, there is funding for the coordinator to allocate funds to technical services and programs. To apply for this position, please submit your CV to the Editor-in-Chief, Pauline Sameshima, psameshima@lakeheadu.ca, by December 15, 2019. Seeking 5 Graduate Students (yearly positions, funding for 3 years) Students will create responses to, or translations of, five previously published JCACS articles. Responses to articles can be done in text and/or with alternative modalities to generate new thinking. We seek to “stir the journal” by bringing forward articles from the archives. To apply for this position, please submit your CV to the Editor-in-Chief, Pauline Sameshima, psameshima@lakeheadu.ca, by December 15, 2019. 2019-12-03T00:00:00-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/113 New JCACS Editor 2018-12-31T00:00:00-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Welcome to the first JCACS French Editor, Dr. Phyllis Dalley! Phyllis Dalley, Ph.D., from the Faculté d’éducation, of the Université d’Ottawa, has focused her research on how schooling participates in the discursive production of inclusions and exclusions and how this process limits the stories we can tell about who we are. Phyllis Dalley, Ph.D., de la Faculté d’éducation à l’Université d’Ottawa, cherche à comprendre comment l’École participe à la production discursive d’inclusions et d’exclusions et comment ce processus impose des limites sur la mise en mots de nos récits identitaires. 2018-12-31T00:00:00-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/111 Call for Submissions: Math-a-POLKA: Mathematics—A Place Of Loving Kindness And . . . 2018-12-12T00:00:00-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Title of Special Issue: Math-a-POLKA: Mathematics—A Place Of Loving Kindness And . . . Guest Editors: Steven Khan (University of Alberta) & Alayne Armstrong (University of Regina) Twentieth century frameworks about the teaching, learning, knowing and doing of mathematics are giving way to emerging sensibilities seeded by a re-invigorated emphasis on human(e) values, grounded in intentional and explicit practices of mindfully curating attention (Acosta & Adamson, 2017), awareness and action with loving kindness. This mythopoetic work (Macdonald, 1981/1995) is emerging from the amplification of activities among popularizers, proselytizers and policy-makers, enabled by networked technology. One node, for example, is the invitation to re-imagine mathematics education as being for “flourishing” (Su, 2017). Why Loving Kindness? Perhaps the ultimate love challenge is to extend toward the one who naturally provokes feelings antithetical to love, anxiety, and alienation. (Gleibberman, 2016) Loving Kindness, in its various interpretations and instantiations across traditions, shares what the editors believe is an explicit and active opposition to incarnations and material practices of human cruelty, violence, humiliation, shaming and brutality. Love and kindness can be learned (Centre for Healthy Minds & Healthy Minds Innovation, 2017; Lack, 1969) and practiced in mathematics at any level (e.g., Duval, 2017) and remain part of the ongoing dynamics of mathematics education (e.g., Ausman, 2018). Many educators have begun to work through traumas, violations, hate, pain, anger, loss and sadness in mathematics and are learning the necessary and difficult knowledge (Pitt & Britzman, 2003) of sharing with our communities. We are reminded that for some, including ourselves, the first and repeated act of kindness is to begin to love oneself as one is, wherever one is. We see this invitation as an opportunity to begin to tell stories and to nurture new myths that heal in the disciplines, and in particular, the discipline of mathematics—the source of much pain, anxiety and unkindness. We appreciate the risk of sharing our vulnerabilities. We believe it is a risk worth taking in this moment as we seek to create more hospitable places of learning (Ellsworth, 2004) in mathematics. This special issue of JCACS aims to stimulate a generative and healing conversation by scholars who position their work in/across mathematics education, curriculum studies and allied fields. An intention of this special issue is to provide an opportunity to engage and connect with each other’s work so as to reduce “connection gaps” (Bruce et al., 2017) that limit language, discourse and imagination across scholarly communities of practice. We encourage thoughtful collaborations that bridge or transcend disciplines, and bring together practitioners working in different settings, to honour the gifts and responsibilities entailed in teaching, learning, knowing and doing mathematics with others. Questions that could be used to think through responses include: • How do you practice loving kindness in your mathematics teaching and learning? • How has this practice emerged, developed and evolved? • When is it hard/impossible to do so? • When might loving kindness be inappropriate? • How does loving kindness re-orient attention, awareness and action? • What resistances arise? • Do socio-material practices and movement (embodied) practices change? • How do we know? Who does it change? • What are some enabling curriculum structures and processes? • What would a kinder math be like? • Are there good examples? • What are the limits of loving kindness? • What do we yet need to know? Proposal Submission Guidelines Prompt/Invitation: Taking a cue from Williams’ (1976/2014) keywords and Singh’s (2017) one-word chapter titles, we invite responders to begin by completing the sentence, "I imagine/want mathematics to be a place of loving kindness and . . . " with their own word, phrase or image. Responses should illustrate the relationship(s) between individual interpretations of loving kindness and individual or collective practices in mathematics teaching and learning at any level. Formats for final submissions may include any of the current or emerging form(s) of scholarly communication such as (but not limited to) essay, academic paper, photo/video-graphy, poetry, twitter essay, memoir, narrative, research fiction, story, infographic, comic/graphic narrative, play, craft or making-based responses etc. Please submit abstracts or proposal descriptions of 250 words and a 50-word biography. While JCACS has its own style guide, please submit following APA 6 conventions, including Times New Roman 12, double-spaced. Please follow the APA referencing style closely. Submit to the "POLKA" submission section. Proposal Deadline: January 14, 2019 Proposal Responses: January 31, 2019 Deadline for full articles: March 15, 2019 Anticipated Publication Date: Fall, 2019 References Acosta, C., & Adamson, G. (2017). Curating attention: Interview with Glenn Adamson. True Living of Art and Design Magazine. Available at https://tlmagazine.com/glenn-adamson-curating-attention/ Ausman, T. (2018). Contested subjectivities: Loving, hating, and learning mathematics (Unpublished doctoral Dissertation). University of Ottawa, ON. Available at https://ruor.uottawa.ca/bitstream/10393/37145/3/Ausman_Tasha_2018_thesis.pdf Bruce, C. D., Davis, B., Sinclair, N., McGarvey, L., Hallowell, D., Drefs, M., . . . Woolcott, G. (2017). Understanding gaps in research networks: Using "spatial reasoning" as a window into the importance of networked educational research. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 95(2), 143-161. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10649-016-9743-2 Centre for Healthy Minds (CFHM) & Healthy Minds Innovation (HMI). (2017). A mindfulness based kindness curriculum for pre-schoolers. University of Wisconsin Madison. Available through https://centerhealthyminds.org/join-the-movement/sign-up-to-receive-the-kindness-curriculum Duval, A. (2018, February 19). Kindness in the mathematics classroom [Blog]. Available at https://blogs.ams.org/matheducation/2018/02/19/kindness-in-the-mathematics-classroom/ Ellsworth, E. (2004). Places of learning. Media, Architecture, Pedagogy. New York, NY: Routledge. Gleibberman, E. (2016). A curriculum of love. Tikkun, 31(4), 54-57. Lack, C. A. (1969). Love as a basis for organizing curriculum. Educational Leadership, 693-701. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el_196904_lack.pdf Macdonald, J. B. (1995). Theory, practice and the hermeneutic circle. In J. B. Macdonald (Ed.), Theory as a prayerful act: The collected essays of James B. Macdonald (pp. 173-186). New York, NY: Peter Lang. First published 1981. Pitt, A., & Britzman, A. (2003). Speculations on qualities of difficult knowledge in teaching and learning: An experiment in psychoanalytic research. Qualitative Studies in Education, 16(6), 755-776. https://doi.org/10.1080/09518390310001632135 Singh, S. (2017). Pi of life: Hidden happiness of mathematics. New York, NY: Rowman & Littlefield. Su, F. (2017, January 8). Mathematics for human flourishing [Blog]. Available at https://mathyawp.wordpress.com/2017/01/08/mathematics-for-human-flourishing/ Williams, R. (2014). Keywords: A vocabulary of culture and society. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. (First published 1976) 2018-12-12T00:00:00-05:00 https://jcacs.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/jcacs/announcement/view/112 Appel à contributions: Mathématiques—espace de bonté bienveillante et . . . 2018-12-12T00:00:00-05:00 Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies Appel à contributions à JCACS Titre du numéro spécial : Mathématiques—espace de bonté bienveillante et . . . Éditeurs invités : Steven Khan (University of Alberta) et Alayne Armstrong (University of Regina) Les cadres théoriques du XXIe siècle portant sur l'enseignement, l'apprentissage, le savoir et le savoir-faire mathématique s’ouvrent à de nouvelles sensibilités, nourries par une (re)dynamisation de l’importance des valeurs humaines(itaires), ancrées dans la pratique intentionnelle et explicite et dans la nécessité d'organiser avec bonté bienveillante, et en pleine conscience, l'attention (Acosta et Adamson, 2017), la sensibilité et l'action. Facilité par la technologie en réseau, le travail « mythopoétique » (Macdonald, 1981/1995) émerge de l'amplification d'activité entre vulgarisateurs, prosélytes et décideurs politiques. Un des nœuds de ce travail est l'invitation de réimaginer l'enseignement des mathématiques comme moyen pour susciter « l’épanouissement » (Su, 2017). Pourquoi la bonté bienveillante? Peut-être que le défi ultime de l'amour est de tendre vers celui qui provoque naturellement des sentiments contraires, l'anxiété et l'aliénation (Gleibberman, 2016). Les éditeurs sont d’avis que toutes les traditions de la bonté bienveillante, et leurs diverses interprétations et expressions, sont explicitement et activement en opposition à toute forme de cruauté, violence, humiliation, moquerie et brutalité humaine. L'amour et la bonté peuvent être appris (Centre for Healthy Minds & Healthy Minds Innovation, 2017; Lack, 1969) et pratiqués en mathématiques à tous les niveaux (ex. Duval, 2017) et demeurer partie prenante de la dynamique actuelle de l'éducation aux mathématiques (ex. Ausman, 2018). Plusieurs enseignants travaillent déjà sur les traumatismes, les violations, la haine, la colère, le deuil et la tristesse et acquièrent le savoir-faire difficile mais nécessaire (Pitt & Britzman, 2003) au partage dans nos communautés. Pour certaines personnes, dont nous-mêmes, de s'aimer soi-même tel que l'on est, là où l'on est, constitue le premier, le second, voire le troisième acte de bonté. Nous voulons que cette invitation soit l'occasion rêvée pour tisser des histoires et nourrir de nouveaux mythes qui guérissent dans les disciplines scolaires, notamment en mathématiques—la source de beaucoup de douleur, d’anxiété et de méchanceté. Nous apprécions le risque encouru par le partage de nos vulnérabilités. Nous croyons qu'il s'agit là d’un risque qui vaut la peine dans la recherche et la création d’espaces d'apprentissage plus accueillants (Ellsworth, 2004) en mathématiques. Ce numéro spécial du JCACS a pour but de stimuler une conversation générative et guérisseuse par des chercheures et chercheurs qui situent leurs travaux en/au travers de la pédagogie/didactique, l’éducation mathématique, l’étude ou la sociologie du curriculum et de domaines alliés. Une intention de ce numéro spécial est d’offrir un espace propice à l’engagement et la connexion avec le travail des uns et des autres afin de réduire les « bris de connexions » (Bruce et al., 2017) qui placent des limites dans le langage, le discours et l’imagination dans l’ensemble des communautés de pratiques intellectuelles. Nous encourageons les collaborations réfléchies qui font le pont entre et transcendent les disciplines et réunissent des praticiens, oeuvrant dans différents contextes, afin de faire hommage aux offres et responsabilités inhérents à l’enseignement, l’apprentissage, le savoir et le savoir-faire mathématiques avec d’autres individus. Questions pouvant soutenir la réflexion sur le thème proposé : • Comment pratiquez-vous la bonté bienveillante dans votre enseignement/apprentissage des mathématiques? • Comment cette pratique a-t-elle émergée et évoluée, comment s’est-elle développée? • Dans quelles situations est-elle difficile/impossible à mettre en œuvre? • Dans quelles situations la bonté bienveillante est-elle inappropriée? • Quelles résistances s’y opposent? • Les pratiques socio-matérielles et les pratiques de mouvements (incarnées) changent-elles? • Comment le savons-nous? Qu’est-ce que cela change? • Quelles structures et quels processus curriculaires sont habilitants? • À quoi ressemblerait une mathématique douce et agréable? • Existent-ils des exemples? • Quelles sont les limites de la bonté bienveillante? • Qu’avons-nous toujours à apprendre? Directives de publication Pistes/Invitation : S’inspirant des mots clés de Williams (1976/2014) et les titres à mot unique de Singh (2017), nous invitons les répondants à débuter en terminant d’un seul mot, phrase ou image, l’énoncée, « J’imagine/ je veux que les mathématiques soient un espace de bonté bienveillante et . . . ». Les propositions devraient illustrer une ou plusieurs rapports entre les interprétations individuelles de la bonté bienveillante et les pratiques individuelles ou collectives de l’enseignement et de l’apprentissage des mathématiques à n’importe quel niveau scolaire. Le format final des soumissions peut correspondre aux conventions actuelles ou émergentes d’une publication scientifique telles que (mais non limité à) l’essai, l’article scientifique, la photo-vidéographie, la poésie, l’essai twitter, le mémoire, le narratif, la fiction scientifique, le conte, l’infographie, le BD/graphique narratif, le jeu théâtral et la réponse expérientielle. S’il vous plait, soumettre un résumé ou une proposition de 250 mots et une biographie de 250 mots. Alors que JCACS a son propre guide stylistique, veuillez utiliser les conventions APA 6 pour le résumé/proposition, y inclus la police Times New Roman 12, espace double. S’il vous plait, suivre le guide bibliographie APA avec diligence. Les soumissions doivent être placées dans la section "POLKA". Date limite des propositions : le 14 janvier, 2019 Réponses aux propositions : le 31 janvier, 2019 Date limite des articles : le 15 mars, 2019 Date prévue de la publication : l’automne, 2019 Références Acosta, C., & Adamson, G. (2017). Curating attention: Interview with Glenn Adamson. True Living of Art and Design Magazine. Available at https://tlmagazine.com/glenn-adamson-curating-attention/ Ausman, T. (2018). Contested subjectivities: Loving, hating, and learning mathematics (Unpublished doctoral Dissertation). University of Ottawa, ON. Available at https://ruor.uottawa.ca/bitstream/10393/37145/3/Ausman_Tasha_2018_thesis.pdf Bruce, C. D., Davis, B., Sinclair, N., McGarvey, L., Hallowell, D., Drefs, M., . . . Woolcott, G. (2017). Understanding gaps in research networks: Using "spatial reasoning" as a window into the importance of networked educational research. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 95(2), 143-161. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10649-016-9743-2 Centre for Healthy Minds (CFHM) & Healthy Minds Innovation (HMI). (2017). A mindfulness based kindness curriculum for pre-schoolers. University of Wisconsin Madison. Available through https://centerhealthyminds.org/join-the-movement/sign-up-to-receive-the-kindness-curriculum Duval, A. (2018, February 19). Kindness in the mathematics classroom [Blog]. Available at https://blogs.ams.org/matheducation/2018/02/19/kindness-in-the-mathematics- classroom/ Ellsworth, E. (2004). Places of learning. Media, Architecture, Pedagogy. New York, NY: Routledge. Gleibberman, E. (2016). A curriculum of love. Tikkun, 31(4), 54-57. Lack, C. A. (1969). Love as a basis for organizing curriculum. Educational Leadership, 693-701. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el_196904_lack.pdf Macdonald, J. B. (1995). Theory, practice and the hermeneutic circle. In J. B. Macdonald (Ed.), Theory as a prayerful act: The collected essays of James B. Macdonald (pp. 173-186). New York, NY: Peter Lang. First published 1981. Pitt, A., & Britzman, A. (2003). Speculations on qualities of difficult knowledge in teaching and learning: An experiment in psychoanalytic research. Qualitative Studies in Education, 16(6), 755-776. https://doi.org/10.1080/09518390310001632135 Singh, S. (2017). Pi of life: Hidden happiness of mathematics. New York, NY: Rowman & Littlefield. Su, F. (2017, January 8). Mathematics for human flourishing [Blog]. Available at https://mathyawp.wordpress.com/2017/01/08/mathematics-for-human-flourishing/ Williams, R. (2014). Keywords: A vocabulary of culture and society. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. (First published 1976) 2018-12-12T00:00:00-05:00