The (In)Efficient Curriculum: An Overview of How Canadian Education Has Historically Failed to Welcome Black Refugee Students

Authors

  • Rebeca Heringer University of Manitoba

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25071/1916-4467.40447

Keywords:

anti-Black racism, Black refugee students, colonization, curriculum studies, philosophy of education

Abstract

For at least a century, educators have sought to define what education should look like, its purposes, content and approach, and how it could be delivered in the most efficient way. However, when looking at some of the most pre-eminent approaches in the history of curriculum studies, it is possible to observe how each of those “efficient” methods have not been able to welcome the uniqueness of Black refugee students. Despite claims of “diversity celebration”, when educators do not challenge and resist White structures and assumptions, even the most “efficient” curriculum falls short of being responsive to the Other, serving, rather, as another disguise to racism, which has long structured Canadian education. I argue that rather than an efficient ready-made set of rules, education must be conceptualized as an act of unconditional openness to the unknown Other, however uncomfortable and “inefficient” that may sound.

Author Biography

Rebeca Heringer, University of Manitoba

Rebeca Heringer is a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Education at the University of Manitoba. She currently works as a sessional instructor (University of Winnipeg and University of Manitoba) and a research assistant. Her main research and teaching areas are philosophy of education, educational psychology, anti-racism education and anti-oppressive research methodologies.

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Published

13-12-2021

How to Cite

Heringer, R. (2021). The (In)Efficient Curriculum: An Overview of How Canadian Education Has Historically Failed to Welcome Black Refugee Students. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 19(1), 88–102. https://doi.org/10.25071/1916-4467.40447

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